Coving in your interior? Why not!

Dodane: 09-09-2016 09:13
Coving in your interior? Why not! mouldings

Imagine the vertical

Molding, or moulding (Commonwealth), also known as coving (UK, Australia), is a strip of material with various profiles used to cover transitions between surfaces or for decoration. It is traditionally made from solid milled wood or plaster, but may be made from plastic or reformed wood. In classical architecture and sculpture, the molding is often carved in marble or other stones.

A "sprung" molding has bevelled edges that allow mounting between two non-parallel planes (such as a wall and a ceiling), with an open space behind the molding. Other types of molding are referred to as "plain".

Contents

1 Theory
2 Types
3 See also
4 References
5 Further reading

Theory

At their simplest, moldings are a means of applying light- and dark-shaded stripes to a structural objects without having to change the material or apply pigments. The contrast of dark and light areas gives definition to the object.

Imagine the vertical surface of a wall lit by sunlight at an angle of about 45 degrees above the wall. Adding a small overhanging horizontal molding to the surface of the wall will introduce a dark horizontal shadow below the molding, which in consequence is called a fillet molding. Adding a vertical fillet to a horizontal surface will create a light vertical shadow. Graded shadows are possible by using moldings in different shapes: the concave cavetto molding produces a horizontal shadow that is darker at the top and lighter at the bottom; an ovolo (convex) molding makes a shadow that is lighter at the top and darker at the bottom. Other varieties of concave molding are the scotia and congé and other convex moldings the echinus, the torus and the astragal.

Placing an ovolo directly above a cavetto forms a smooth s-shaped curve with vertical ends that is called an ogee or cyma reversa molding. Its shadow appears as a band light at the top and bottom but dark in the interior. Similarly, a cavetto above an ovolo forms an s with horizontal ends, called a cyma or cyma recta. Its shadow shows two dark bands with a light interior.

Together the basic elements and their variants form a decorative vocabulary that can be assembled and rearranged in endless combinations. This vocabulary is at the core of both classical architecture and Gothic architecture.

Decorative moldings have been made of wood, stone and cement. Recently moldings made of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) as a core with a cement-based protective coating have become popular. These moldings have environmental, health and safety concerns that were investigated by Doroudiani et al.1

Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molding_(decorative)


orders at home stucco

Stucco home has features of both artistic and decorative. Taking a purely decorative stucco seems to be simpler and more understandable in reception for all guests taking home than performing stucco art. Plaster of the latter type is often carried out, for example, in museums. Orders for performing stucco home are adopted by companies or individuals specializing in performing this kind of ornaments that are durable and can be fixed in different places home. Most often they are published in the kitchen and the guest rooms and corridors. Some decoration made of wood or plaster may no longer greet guests as they enter the house.
Usable stucco
Usable stucco is included in various venues and artistic centers. As a result, their appearance may enjoy the eye and amaze customers or guests in a good mood. Among the places where you can admire the utility stucco are restaurants. In them, stucco, is included under the ceilings or floor panels. Stucco elements can also be found in stores, especially those that sell a variety of homemade trinkets or some more artistic products. In contrast, most artistic stucco can be found in museums. It serves ago that people who came to some art exhibition could immediately be put to the climate of the prepared exhibition.


Traditionally, moulding planes

In woodworking, a moulding plane (molding plane in US spelling) is a specialised plane used for making the complex shapes found in wooden mouldings. 1

Traditionally, moulding planes were blocks of wear resistant hardwood, often beech or maple, which were worked to the shape of the intended moulding. The blade, or iron was likewise formed to the intended moulding profile and secured in the body of the plane with a wooden wedge. A traditional cabinetmakers shop might have many, perhaps hundreds, of moulding planes for the full range of work to be performed. The late nineteenth century brought modern types which were all-metal affairs such as the American Stanley No. 55 Universal Plane2 and the English Record No. 405 Multi-Plane with a wide variety of interchangeable cutters, integral fences, and "nickers", small cutting edges which score the grain fibers when working across the board.3

Large crown mouldings required planes of six or more inches in width, which demanded great strength to push and often had additional peg handles on the sides, allowing the craftsman's apprentice or other worker to pull the plane ahead of the master who guided it.4:132
Stanley No. 55 Universal plane with wide array of interchangeable cutters.

While generally considered outdated, a modern furniture shop doing reproduction or restoration work might keep a collection of moulding planes to match original work, or to build in an authentic manner.

The earliest known record of a moulding plane is a moulding plane iron of Roman origin unearthed in Cologne, Germany.4:116

In modern industry, the work of the moulding plane has been taken up by the electrically powered spindle moulder or wood shaper. On a smaller scale, the hand-held or table-mounted electric router allows the use of interchangeable router bits of a wide variety of profiles and is readily available to the small business or home craftsperson.

Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moulding_plane



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